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Sürgün

Sürgün

Hello my friends, today I would like to give you an idea for a great holiday: Sürgün.
Sürgün it’s a 27-metre caicco with 4 standard cabins and 1 master cabin, air condictioning and 220-volt electrical supply. The extremely hospitable and tactful crew will guide you in the Southeast coast of Turkey, exploring many archaeological sites, hidden natural gems, towns and villages. You may try water sports such as swimming, diving and snorkelling. You can choose between numerous itineraries available, from Bodrum to Finike: the Gulf of Gokova, Knidos, the Datca Peninsula, Hisaronu Bay, Marmaris, Iztuzu beach, Ekincik, Dalyan, Kalkan, Kas, Kekova, Kalekoy, Ucagiz, Myra, Adrasan Bay, Olympos… I’ve been there, and I can confirm you that these are enchanting places, and with the caicco you’ll be able to explore wonderful beaches and inlets otherwise inaccessible by land.
So, what are you waiting for, I would highly recommend you to contact the Baranta Yachting, they are very friendly and professional, making you feel as though you are actually on your own boat.

Enjoy Sürgün and Turkey!

Baranta Yachting
Captain Mahmut Mehmetoglu
http://barantayachting.com/
barantasurgun@yahoo.com

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Palmyra, Tadmur‎, Syria

Palmyra, Tadmur‎, Syria

I’m right back from a fantastic week in Syria, and although this is a space dedicated to Istanbul, I’d like to share with you just some ideas and pics about my trip, and hope you’ll enjoy them! My trip started from Damascus, one of the most important cities of the Middle East. I had the chance to visit the National Archaeologycal Museum, with lots of interesting finds from Palmyra, Ebla and Mari, and the Dura Europos synagogue, the Via Recta with its fascinating load of history, and the coloured suk Al-Hamidiyya. But the places I loved most were the Umayyad Mosque, one of the largest and oldest mosques in the world, built on a Christian basilica, and the Azem Palace, an excellent example of Damascene traditional houses.

A lantern @ Azem Palace in Damascus

A lantern @ Azem Palace in Damascus

The Umayyad Mosque in Damascus

The Umayyad Mosque in Damascus

Prayer in the Umayyad Mosque

Prayer in the Umayyad Mosque

After a visit to Bosra, a major archaeological site which has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site and hosts an integrally preserved II° century Roman theater, constructed probably under Trajan, we headed to Palmyra. Once you arrive at this gorgeous site you can’t help gaping… it’s speachless, especially if you are so lucky to reach the site at dusk, when everything turns red and the atmosphere brings you back at the ancient times when Palmyra was buildt… It has long been a vital caravan city along the Silk Road, and its colonnades, temples and burial towers in the striking setting of the desert have a great fascination. Don’t forget to pay a visit to the Qala’at ibn Maan castle, built on top of a mountain overlooking the oasis: you’ll have a great sight of Palmyra from the top!

Young boy in the middle of Antiquity in Palmyra (Arabic: تدمر Tadmur‎), Syria

Young boy in the middle of Antiquity in Palmyra (Arabic: تدمر Tadmur‎), Syria

The following stop was the Krak des Chevaliers, a Crusaders fortress 40 km west of the city of Homs, close to the border of Lebanon. Here I had a great surprise: I met a primary school mate… “The world is not enough” as James Bond would say 🙂 Then we headed toward Hama, a city on the banks of the Orontes River renowned for its 17 norias used for watering the gardens, which—it is claimed—date back to 1100 BC. Hope you’ll appreciate the poem by Yunus Emre that a fellow traveller recalled [Thanks, Ali! ;)]:

Noria of lovesickness

The Krak des Chevaliers, Homs

The Krak des Chevaliers, Homs

Noria, Poor, why whine?
I suffer pains and bitternesses.
I fell in love with Love
And for that I’m moaning.

My name is Noria of lovesickness,
my waters run and run,
I fell in love:
I suffer and I’m moaning.

I am a tree in the forest
I am not sweet or bitter,
I am a servant of love,
I suffer and I’m moaning.

View of Hama, Syria

View of Hama, Syria

They sought me on the peaks,
they drowned me in the depths,
Craft forged me,
Assembled mi limbs.
He granted me this sigh
I suffer and I’m moaning.

I draw the waters from the deep,
I climb up and verse them.
Look, my brothers, my burden.
I suffer and I’m moaning.

Yunus Emre

To be continued…

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Tarkan

Tarkan

Taksim Square – 16th of January…big big big concert organized by the city hall of Istanbul, for the grand opening of the European Cultural Capital of 2010.
announced time for the Tarkan concert – 21:15.

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The flag of Turkey

The flag of Turkey in Kaş, Antalya

In a couple of days I’ll be in Istanbul again. In this post I’d like to talk a little bit about something you’ll see many times during your turkish stay: the flag of the Republic of Turkey.

It is a red flag with a white crescent moon and a star in its centre. The flag is called Ay Yıldız (literally, moon star) or Alsancak (red banner) in Turkish, and a lot of shops, apartment balcony, and every boat are draped in the red and white of the Turkish flag. The current design of the Turkish flag is directly derived from the late Ottoman flag, which had acquired its final form in 1844. It is known that the Ottomans used red flags of triangular shape at least since 1383, which came to be rectangular over the course of history. Ottomans used several different designs, most of them featuring one or more crescents, for different purposes, such as the flag with green background signifying the caliphate. During the late imperial period, the distinctive use of the color red for secular and green for religious institutions became an established practice. In 1844, the eight-pointed star was replaced with a five-pointed star and the flag reached the form of the present Turkish flag; Red was the colour of Umar I, the Caliph who ruled from AD 634 to 644 and was known as a great consolidator of the Islamic Empire. In the 14th century red became the colour of the Ottoman Empire. The crescent and star is the symbol of Turks. The origin of the flag is the subject of various legends in the country, some contradicting the historical knowledge about the Ottoman Flag.

Turkish flag

Turkish flag in Simena, Antalya


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Earth

Fight the Climate Change and protect our Earth!

Travel in Istanbul is proud to join the Blog Action Day ,the annual event held every October 15 that invites the world’s bloggers in publishing blogs, podcasts, and videocasts on an issue of global importance: last year it was poverty, and the topic for this year it’s climate change.

The reason is a need to reintroduce the discussion about climate change and actions to mitigate its effects. Blog Action Day hopes that blogging will pressure the government to act with a sense of urgency on the problem of climate change, and we must be unite in order to fight the indifference to this global issue. We’ve just this earth, and we must preserve and defend it.
Don’t you think? 😉

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